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not accept what happened from some of the citizens of the united states who offended the prophet mohammed-- peace be upon him. there was also somebody who wanted to burn the koran and this is something we do not accept at all. so the demonstrations were an expression of a high level of anger and a rejection of what is happening and the u.s. embassy represents the symbol of america as a people and government so people, the demonstrators, had a loud voice and as a government, it's our responsibility as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this
of saudi intelligence, ambassador to the united states and other countries >> and throughout these 80 some years that we have had our kingdom, everybody keeps talking about an uncertain future for the kingdom and because of the sagacity of the people of saudi arabia and the good will of the leadership and the government we have survived pretty well so far we have many problems to face, including syria. many challenges internally among the young people and how the go about the courses of development not just economically but socially and politically and the role of women, etc. all of these are tremendous challenges that are being debated within the kingdom and not coming from the outside. >> rose: tom friedman and prince turki al-faisal when we continue. fb captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here, he is a pulitzer prize winning columnist in for the "new york times." for more than 30 years he's been writing ant foreign affairs, american politics and so much more. in addition to serving as bureau chief
is still very volatile. >> absolutely, and going forward the united states is going to have to deal with this. to what extent do we make foreign assistance conditional? if so, on what kinds of behavior is? this is not limited to libya of. this is going to be the case in cairo with egypt's going forward. this is going to be an extremely difficult diplomatic process. there are going to be moments of instability, and this is not going to be short lived. i think we are talking about years and decades of uneasy relationships with regimes that are unable or unwilling to be a partner with the united states. >> you have often said this is going to take time, but we have seen what protests in tunis, protests in libya, protests in egypt, you think the washington establishment has come up with a convincing way of dealing with the arab world in light of the arab spring? >> the short answer is no. part of the middle east is i believe there is a reduction of influence for all outsiders. there is also reduction of influence for authority. it is not clear what governments can control, so i think it
, there are conflicting views of beijing's role as banker to the united states government. some see it as a source of leverage, but others see chinese holdings of u.s. debt as an investment with little return. >> it's not invested in their own country. it hasn't been given to their own people. it's a gigantic waste of money. and really, it does not give china leverage over the u.s., because if they used it, they'd only be shooting themselves in the foot. so, in that respect, i think it's as much a symbol of a weak imbalances in the chinese economy as it is of chinese power. >> reporter: and even if the chinese government wanted to sell off u.s. treasuries, it's not clear it could find a buyer. >> the bigger problem is if they announced that they were simply not going to participate in the next treasury auction or the next three or four treasury auctions. that would produce something of a scramble to see who would participate. the result would probably be some increase in interest rates here. >> reporter: but even that seems likely to hurt china as much or more than the united states. china buys u.
against the united states without some consequencesment now that authority has been removed. the imams and other speakers at friday prayers are free to say almost whatever they want. and that makes the situation far more dangerous. >> protests and deaths in the middle east. and political implications in america when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided byhe olg:lowin c c 1wi . >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. in this presidential election of 2012 foreign policy was not considered to be an important factor. that's all changed now because on monday night when american diplomatic interests came under attack in egypt and libya, tragically ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in benghazi, governor romney has attempted to make some political attacks out of the situation. and here is what he said. >> i think it's a-- a -- -- a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> rose: president obama responded in kin
united states and pakistan. >> ok, when you're at the state department, you revise the u.s. government on relations between pakistan and afghanistan. mousavi video president obama put out, this thing -- you saw the video president obama put up, distancing america from the film. does that help? >> it does help. it is the first time united states is taking this kind of innovative pro-active measure. in some ways, you are trying to use this when already a tidal wave has started. it is hard to stop a tidal wave. >> is there anything washington can do? >> keep engaging on an ongoing basis. not this one a crisis happens. also, when we have disagreements with pakastani, we should explain ourselves to them. we should have kept them engaged. where we see the consequences of the collapse of the relationship as we saw today, then we try to come up with these measures, and often they are good, but they are too little to late. >> is that the problem? we have a short-term policy? >> we decided we should punish them, put pressure on pakistan. well, it worked to an extent, but the consequences also pu
to stay as president of the united states. he says he shares the pain and frustration of those who have lost their jobs but have never been more hopeful about america because of its people. this election would be the clearest choice in a generation. >> it will be a choice between two pads for america, between different visions for the future. >> this was not the rhetoric of four years ago. instead it workmanlike presence on the hard path to a better place. he derided his opponent as the same old failed policies of the past. >> have a surplus? try a tax cut. the deficit is too high? try another. stilicho coming on? take to bank tax cuts and rollbacks and regulations and call us in the morning. >> he mocked mitt romney's lack of foreign experience. >> you might not be ready if you cannot visit the olympics without insulting our closest allies. >> scarcely time to catch a breath and both hit the campaign trail. this is what greeted the president. >> we are not better off under president obama. fewer jobs, higher taxes on middle-fu p fuel prices have doubled. >> with the romney campaign is
. this is a manifestation of that ongoing conflict. the united states has been attacking these elements steadily in recent years through the use of drums and the elements are trying to find ways to strike back. a big maybe the timing is interesting because in the aftermath of the raid, pakistan- u.s. relations hit rock bottom. they're starting to improve, so maybe it is trying to rekindle those tensions. >> his id emboldening militants and pakistan? >> there is a dynamic between afghanistan and pakistan. the united states as tried to get some of these elements to negotiate a peace settlement and they have been unwilling to do that. notwithstanding the united states strategy to appeal some of the elements of the violence strategy in the political process, this war continues. >> can you tell us about the location of today's attack? >> is a major pakistan the city. and what makes it a significant is the proximity to the largely under-governed tribal areas. that is where they are based, where the taliban escape to in the aftermath of u.s. and international intervention. it is the remaining safe haven where th
, for responding to this video with violence. a> woodruffingain to distght gast to dio ance the united states' government from the film and its maker. the associated press reported that he's been identified as a coptic christian living in california with a checkered legal past. actors in the film said that they were duped, that the blasphemous and offensive dialogue was later dubbed in. and not just muslims, but coptic christians in cairo denounced the film and its apparent intent. >> ( translated ): if it is proven that there is a copt that participated in the making of this movie, the church 100% refuses him. >> woodruff: there were efforts to remove the video from view. the government of afghanistan tried to block youtube access. and in egypt and libya, youtube restricted users from playing the clip. meanwhile, american naval and military assets in the mediterranean, incding warships and drone aircraft, refocused on libya, a country they helped liberate last year as part of a u.n.-sanctioned, nato operation. >> woodruff: nancy yousseff of mcclathy y wspapers. she has been reporting on the
, the attempt to improve relations with china and russia. obviously he's got the uwe united states out of iraq. the united states after going up has now come down to some extent in afghanistan. the middle east, even though it's turbulent, is more open than it was. so i think the president in general can point to some areas where he moved forward and some areas obviously his critics will say where he movedded back. all in all it's a defense i believe and defendable record. >> ifill: i want to walk through some of that piece by piece. referencing the president's speech today, he turned over a big chunk of it to talking about the difference between railing against or speaking out against violence... violent extremism versus protecting free speech. why was so much devoted to that topic? >> gwen, i thought it was an interesting speech. very reflective speech. i think probably designd by the president and his advisors to try to heal some of the wounds that have been so apparent between the muslim world and the united states over these last two weeks, these very tragic weeks. i thought it was interes
economy. that is why he united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> woodruff: but iran's president, mahmoud ahmadinejad, has long insisted that the country's nuclear program is only for peaceful purposes. and during his own speech yesterday, he denounced potential military action by israel. >> testing new generations of ultra-modern weaponry and the pledge to disclose these armaments in due time is now being used as a new language of threat against nations to coerce them into accepting a new era of hegemony. continued threats by the uncivilized zionists to resort to military action against our great nation is a clear example of this bitter reality. >> woodruff: earlier this week, iran unveiled a new long-range reconnaissance drone and the country's revolutionary guard said it tested new missiles as well. prime minister netanyahu noted that while international sanctions by the u.s. and other countries have hurt the iranian economy, they did not stop its nuclear program. >> there's only one way to peacefully prevent iran from getting atomic bombs. a
's accomplished. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! trade tensions between the united states and china are heating up again. this morning, the two countries challenged each other in the world trade organization. the u.s. is accusing china of illegally subsidizing auto and auto parts exports, and hurting u.s. made goods. and china claims trade laws here, open the door for illegal tariffs on a wide range of chinese products. sylvia hall breaks down what's behind the latest flareup. >> reporter: here in the u.s., the auto and auto parts industries employ about 800,000 american workers. the government says those workers are hurt by the money china gives to subsidize its own auto industry. and in ohio, a key swing state fueled by cars, president obama promised a crack down: >> these are subsidies that directly harm working men and women on the assembly lines in ohio and michigan and across the midwest. it is not right, it is against the rules, and we will not let it stand. >> reporter: the administration said that between 2009 and 2011, the chinese government offered up at least $1 billion in subsidies
? >> it is an interesting moment when egypt is partially reconstructing it shrek -- its relation with the united states. the military relationship continues, and that has gone on for many years. yet now there is an elected civilian president that is trying to assert the degree of independence at a moment when both sides are now trying to understand the priorities of each other, and the united states is adjusting to an egyptian leader that has to respond to some degree to the wants and desires of his own people. it is a much more high maintenance type of relationship because nothing can be taken for granted in the same way that it was when egypt was essentially a client state. >> president morsi called syria the tragedy of the age. any new ideas there about how to stop the fighting? >> not so much. this is indicative of egypt's position at the moment. more aspirational and ambitious with respect to charting a more independent course, but of course egypt is consumed by domestic affairs, particularly on the economic front. so egypt is not in a position to really exert great influence on the syrian civil w
as the democratic candidate for vice president of the united states. he will be speak later this will evening introduced by his wife dr. jill biden. then his mentor and friend senator dick durbin will introduce the president of united states for the acceptance speech. this crowd has been on its feet much of evening and the hall is very crowded. the crowd got up as one and roared its ak race for former -- acclamation for former congresswomanwoman gabrielle ge towards of arizona felled by a devastating gun shot to the head. slowly, painstakingly and with her friend debbie wasserman schultz of florida she came to the stage to lead the pledge of allegiance. [cheers and applause] >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands one nation under god indif indivisible with liberty and justice for all. [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] >> ifill: that was some moment. >> woodruff: it was. i don't think there were many dry eyes. >> ifill: joining us in the sky box is madeleine albright former secretary of state. welcome. >> very good
further monetary policy to boost the united states economy. after last friday's disappointing labor report there is a growing call for a robust response from the central bank which is the fed, financial markets have rallied with the expectation of a third round of bond buying known as cuan tative easing. but that option is controversial with the election two months away. joining me from washington david leonhardt, washington bureau chief of the "new york times". in 2011 he won a pulitzer prize for his columns on the u.s. economy. i'm pleased to have him back on this program. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what might the fed do and what consequences might happen? >> well, the fed is now talking about doing a version of something it has already done a couple timesment people may have heard the phrase q e3 to refer to what this is n technical terms that is quantitative easing 3. let's skip the technical terms, in essence it would buy up assets. in the course of buying up assets it would try to reduce long-term interest rates. short trem interest rates are already essentially at zero, the
hussein obama solemnly swear. >> i will execute the office to the office of the president united states faithfully. >> that i will execute. >> faithfully the -- the office -- >> the office the united states faithfully. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the united states. >> preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the united states. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> rose: the problem. >> the problem was the phrase do so legally swear, because obama .. jumped in after barack hussein obama, i do not had said solemnly swear would be in that first stanza, but .. obama didn't know that so they were off kilter from the very beginning and then you saw roberts really just sort of lost his place. >> rose: and had a bit of -- there was some worry that the new president was not officially the new president? >> well, that is the next day story. of course in the -- all the excitement of the inaugural balls, no one thought much about it, the next morning,
the right of free speech and hurts the religious beliefs of others. today in the united states and many places around the world, people stopped to mark the of the 11th anniversary of the september 11 attacks in which nearly 3000 were killed. the president led a moment of silence this morning and then traveled to the pentagon for a ceremony there. in new york, people gathered at the memorial's where twin towers once stood. more than a decade later, where does the greatest threat remained? i spoke with a senior fellow at the center for american progress. before i get to where we are 11 years on, here we are at the council of in ben ghazi in libya, a country that americans helped to liberate from colonel gaddafi, being stormed. it is an indication, is in it, of how strong muslim feelings are around the world and that they can turn against the u.s.? >> yes, and is similar to what we have seen in the -- in afghanistan over the last few years when we have seen the koran being destroyed. or other things like this pastor with inflating opinions. even when we use our military might, we do not ne
rounded up suspected insurgents are in the hands of the united states. there is still a fundamental dispute between u.s. commanders and the afghan government over what sort of process the afghans will use to continue to detain inmates and how they're going to try to adjudicate the release of some of them. afghanistan does not have on its books any sort of laws to indefinitely detained people for security violations. will they seek to put some of them on trial and release others? >> it is symptomatic of the real breakdown in trust between washington and the afghan authorities in the run-up to this handover. >> what is particularly striking about today's event is that senior nato commanders did not show up. general allan, the american and passenger, none of them were there. it was left to a junior ranking officer to take the american position on the dais. >> at the same time, we have these reports coming now of one london-based group that the taliban are interested in negotiating and it was quickly denied. what do you read in the political side of this? >> president karzai wants to ha
moving towards democracy. let me be clear. as we can solve every problem in the world, the united states has not and will not dictate the outcome of a democratic transitions. >> with strong feeling and a new era of democracy, it's not as if they can. the protests have made the middle east and issue only six weeks away. with accusations that president obama approach has been weak. president obama could still call upon the egyptian president and other authoritarian arab springs. the american president -- he is the first arab in a crisis. now they needed to address both and a new friend to put in it. in his speech, he defended his response to the arab uprising and looking past the elections to a nuclear installations, they warn that time is running out. >> it is not a talent that can be contained. it will threaten the elimination of israel and the stability of the global economy. it also triggers a nuclear arms race in the region. that is why a coalition of countries is holding government accountable. that is what the united states must do what we must do to prevent iran from obtaining a nu
. >> it was an unhappy time for him freur years ago. a moment of great triumph. >> important for the united states was elect barack obama. >> charlie:how would you define the relationship other than they need each other. >> i think they have genuine respect for each other. they talk more than you think. i think that was a process that built up after what was a contentious set of primaries. but i think from the moment that president obama got into office, president clinton really tried to do his best to support him when they reached out he always helped. >> charlie:that's not necessarily the story you hear, john. people say that the president has said -- former president he got more phone calls from george bush than he did from barack obama in the first year or 2. >> i think if you asked him that question today he would say they have a very serious, respectful relationship and they talk and they. >> charlie:but the point is what people around him say and people who know his thoughts said. >> a lot of people like to trade in that kind of gossip. but i know the reality. the reality is, you know, bara
of the world live in the united states. and we are a consumer goods company, so we sell to where people are and, therefore, when you expect that there is or than 95 percent of the population of the world live outside of the united states you would spec we would have a large business outside of the united states. >> rose: is it primarily coca-cola or is it not the company but the drink or is it all kind of water products that seem mohr in demand than ever? >> i think we talk, we just -- >> rose: what makes the people outside of the united states -- >> we look at ourselves as the number one and premiere beverage company in the world and we have -- we offer 3,000 products, 500 more than, 500 brands and choice i think is the key. >> rose: but how is that change something it has to be changing, is the product mix change something aren't you finding the demand for things you weren't making five years ago? >> yes, and that's why i think choice is great. you have to offer consumers choice. see, what we have -- the way the world has changed is that for the first time in the history of our planet there a
than what i think the people of the world expected from the united states of america. and if i'm elected president of this country, i will get us back on a road of growth and prosperity and strength. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of late, and the president may be getting a boost from voter attitudes. an nbc news/"wall street journal" poll out last week found 42% of americans think the economy will improve in the next year. that's six points higher than a month ago. 18% say the economy will worsen, and almost a third expect it to stay the same. the obama campaign is also pointing to some revised job numbers to make its case. the u.s. bureau of labor statistics said yesterday there were
. god bless america. >> first lady of the united states, the most popular women in the country. more popular than her husband. certainly more popular than anybody else in this room right now, judy. >> woodruff: i think by far, gwen, the woman who knows the president of the united states better than anyone in 22-23-minute speech, it was a blend of the personal, the biographical, the political, the inspirational, and a call to arms. making almost a plea at the end there to people to recognize that they need to go out and work to get her husband elected for this country to move ahead and do what it can do and be what it can be. >> she is more in love with her house now than four years ago and probably hoping everybody in this room and outside this room was more in love as well. >> you're right. i think it was a genius speech, true genius. it was sophisticate sophisticate without ever once mentioning mitt romney's name, she drew a stark, graphic, dramatic contrast between the two lives. she basically said, quoting-- without quoting barry swisser, the great oklahoma university coach, mitt
arrived for her first official visit to the united states. her trip comes as the obama administration considers lifting remaining economic sanctions against her country. on wednesday she accepted the congressional medal of honor and met with president obama for the first time. i spoke with her earlier today at the plaza hotel here in new york. and here is that conversation. >> rose: thank you for taking time in a very busy schedule to see us. >> pleasure. >> rose: i have two simple questions. where are you in your life at this moment? and where is your country? >> well, they're not simple questions at all. they're the most difficult questions to answer. if you are asking where i am, of course, i can say i am here. but i think my country and i, we are all at the beginning of the path to democracy. i've often said that this is something that we'll have to construct for ourselves. it's not there smooth and waiting it is something that we have to build up as we go along. >> rose: why dow believe that's true now? >> because we have been given the chance to do it. previously we were not giv
in crime scenes in mexico and the united states. there was very little effort to interdict the weapons to stop them from going across the border and, of course, with the death of agent bryan terry and other deaths, we see what the consequences are. >> brown: so the key questions became-- of course, it became a political issue, who is responsible for this, how much were the white house and the attorney general's office involved? so what does the report tell us? >> well, the harshest criticism comes down for an official in the criminal division, his name is jason weinstein. he resigned yesterday under pressure. and essentially he is called out for repeatedly having access to documents, wiretap applications, for instance, he had-- he read summaries of and perhaps didn't read all of it and didn't ask follow-up questions. the inspector general says that, you know, if he knew about an earlier operation called "wide receiver" in the bush administration. now, that was 2006 and 2007 and allowed about 400 firearms to be trafficked. and weinstein finds out about this in early 2009 and instead of
barak obama, president of the united states. democrats believe in reigniting the american dream by removing barriers to success and building ladders of opportunity for all. so that everyone can succeed. jobs are central to the american dream. and president obama has focused on jobs from day one. under president obama we've gone from losing 800,000 jobs a month to adding 4.5 million private sector jobs over the last 29 months. the american dream is about freedom. jobs means freedom. for workers to support their families. working with president obama, democrats passed a lilly better pay fair act to strengthen women's rights in the workplace. we repealed don't ask don't tell so our troops can serve the country they love regardless of whom they love. we made college more affordable. house democrats passed the dream act. but senate republicans blocked it. with president obama, democrats enacted the toughest consumer safeguards in history. to protect main street from wrecklessness of some on wall street. democrats passed healthcare reform to allow americans the freedom to pursue their
, this is something the progressives in the united states have been trying to achieve since the progressive party bull moose party platform of 1912, 100 years, seven presidents tried, including some republicans, none succeeded until barack obama. and i asked the president, your advisors were against this, why did you do it? and he said, well i told nancy pelle city i may not get re-elected if i did this and so i repeated the question, why did you do it. >> if we didn't do it now it wouldn't have happened and to me that is the mark of a president who is showing leadership. you might not like it. >> rose: yes. >> but it is leadership. >> rose: i would say the following, john, i hear you and i know all of that, i have heard that conversation, i believe with a that even though he said i might not get re-elected he didn't for a moment believe that he would not get re-elected because his own confidence in himself was so strong. >> absolutely true. yes, he is extremely self-confident individual. >> even at this moment he understands intellectually the challenge and the risks and where the numbers are and al
lost. >> and that was a special insult because for the president of the united states to interfere with a democratic primary clinton was the giant squashing like a bug. >> charlie:other days you during the impeachment. >> he saw clinton as part of a machine. '96 convention is for sale quoted in the newspaper saying. clinton's policy was just another way for throwing poor people under the bus. so he has this kind of philosophical objection to clin on earlier in his life that i'm not sure -- i'm not sure he has anything nor more. i don't think anybody has asked him in an interview. it would be fascinating to ask the president. >> qul he changed. >> charlie:changed his attitude about president clinton. >> and the clinton way of doing things. retail politics, compromise incrementalism. >> i think he learned those lessons. >> charlie:what is about president obama those who watch him closely he doesn't lie business. when business people come to the white house they feel like they simply are there to listen to him rather than to learn from them. and that he has a certain disdain from busi
the administration that the united states (no audio) take military action if other diplomatic effort have failed. >> warner: when the israelis talk about a red line, what is it exactly they want? what do they want president obama to say or do? >> i'm not sure that the israelis are speaking... seeking for a public promise. i'm quite certain that israel would (no audio) secretly. but to show israel that if diplomatic efforts and connection with iran in the next, i would say, six months to nine months fail, then an iran (no audio) would not agree to stop the enrichment and disassemble the nuclear site. then the administration would go for other options including the military strike. these red lines that the secretary of state, as we heard, refused to make secretly and publicly are the ones that would relax israel satisfied. as long as the administration intentionally is very vague on that and does not want to promise any sort of military action in the coming future, i think that we are going to see an ongoing tension increasingly between the two administrations. >> warner: what has the obama admini
problems that we have here in the united states. >> ifill: is there also a problem with coming to some sort of resolution as far as germany and other bank-- money-- money givers go? that somebody else is going to get in line. that if you give greece money, spain is going to be standing there. if you give spain money portugal could be standing there. >> there is this problem of political moral hazard going on which is really, as you say, well, if you give us, let's say, debt relief to greece, well, then you can be pretty sure that other european countries that also have received bailouts will want the same treatment. so what you're trying to do in europe, in minute, is really to-- i believe that ultimately debt relief will have-- further debt relief will have to be given to greece by the euro area governments. but they're really trying to make the road to that so arduous and so terrible that nobody else in europe will really want to go down that route. and as we're looking at greece today-- which has a cumulative decline in g.d.p. of, you know, close to 20% and still dropping-- i think it's
anti-western feeling in a wide swath of the world. in the united states, the body of the dead u.s. ambassador and his three colleagues that were killed in the attack or brought home. it was a part of the world in which it once had real political power. -- they once had real political power. >> and just a brief time ago, i spoke to jeremy in cairo. i asked what the sentiment was like. >> there is a lot of anger. in egypt, it has become more complicated because a lot of local issues have been grafted onto the initial anger about the film. now, i think what is significant today is that it has spread to other countries, and i think the more other countries, and because today is the muslim day of prayer, perhaps it might be the combination, but there have been people killed. and there are real, genuine grievances behind all of this. >> jeremy bowen in tahrir square for us there. i spoke with robin wright. thank you for coming in. has the tyranny of the dictator in the middle east been replaced by the tyranny of the mob? >> that is the great danger, and the fact that this has moved in
deal signed with the united states in 2008. the government is desperate to see it through. india is one of the world's fastest-growing economies, but it also faces a major shortage of power. it is looking for new energy sources for its factories, businesses, and to cater to the needs of its rapidly-growing population. the government believed that nuclear power is one way to address this gap. as is evidenced, not everyone believes it is the only solution. bbc news, delhi. >> it was music to the ears of traders on wall street when the u.s. federal reserve announced bold steps today to help stimulate the american economy. the measures included buying $40 billion worth of mortgage debt per month until the outlook for jobs improves. at the same time, the fed lowered its growth forecast for this year. we have the details. >> business is booming for this country based in five u.s. cities. all of the 75 workers who have been employed in the last two years are the lucky ones. 12.5 million of their parallel -- their fellow americans are unemployed. the real number is probably a lot larger. many h
, but what has happened this, the united states has 16 trillion dollars in outstanding ious in the world, and we are spending a trillion dollars more each year than we have. so we have to go into the debt market regularly, and it puts everything in jeopardy, in peril. the treasury secretary, tim geithner, here in the u.s., is running around hollering fire. we've got to do something about this. the simple fact is that the politicians have not been willing to come up with a plan that would involve paying for republicans and democrats, something that is a compromise. so we head into this election with the financial house that is not in order. >> you are very clear in this book that this president, unlike previous presidents, has not worked his will. what are the consequences of that? >> they may be very substantial. president reagan in and president clinton, you can criticize them, and a lot of people would, but they had a way of carrying things over the finish line and getting their way. obama is still distant, somewhat removed from this. he has not engaged on a personal level enough with
"brown v. board of education." think of cases that have interpreted the constitution of the united states around equal rights and so when we talk about the importance of the presidency it's certainly about the economic issues of that nature. but this could have impacts for hundreds of years. >> i do have to ask this question. there's going to be 28 women paraded on the stage tonight to talk about the power of the republican party. >> we only have 17% of women in congress. we only have 17 women senators, we only have six governors who are women we still have a very long way to go and when the house of representatives is having a hearing about access to birth control and the first panel is devoid of a woman, women women's voices aren't being heard. >> ifill: thank you both, one of those women is on the floor right now, that's congresswoman nidia valasquez of new york. >> i am proud to speak to you as a hispanic american. as a proud latina and a puerto rican. (cheers and applause) from being the first in my family to attend college to becoming the first latina to chair a full congressional c
that abu hamza -- >> the european court has ruled that abu hamza can be extradited to the united states. in america, abu hamza is accused of planning at terrorist training camp in oregon and assisting hostage-taking. the former israeli prime minister ehud olmert has received a fine and a suspended sentence and the corruption case -- in the corruption case. roman catholics in germany who have opted out of paying the country's religious tax will not be denied holy communion -- will now be denied holy communion and religious burial. this brings the church about $6.5 billion per year. china has moved a step closer towards drawn a line under its biggest political scandal in decades -- drawing a line under its biggest political scandal in decades. we told you about the crime committed by the wife of bo xilai. one of the most powerful figures in the country was jailed today for 15 years. now officials can deal with bo xilai himself, who was once destined for a leadership role in the party. >> in just a few weeks, china will unveil a new leadership. the men who will govern 1/fifth -- 1/5 of hum
it become a genuine crisis. it's also a reminder to the united states of why it is seen as important by many nations in asia that we stay as a balancing factor in the military relationship there >> warner: china doesn't like that >> they would prefer it to having japan arm itself. so everybody resents the u.s. presence but is more comforting than the most obvious alternative >> warner: do you have a prediction? >> i think it will calm down but the issues will be simmering for some time. all the territorial maritime issues that are taking place now are of a peace. the political process is still playing out in china. the leaders there want to contain the damage to themselves but they don't want to be so suppressing of popular opinion that they're seen as opposing popular will on the issue of sovereignty >> warner: or out of touch. doug paal and jim fall owes, thank you. >> woodruff: next, seeking peace in syria and around the globe. jeffrey brown talks to former u.n. secretary general kofi annan. >> brown: kofi annan's first career u.n. staffer to rise to head the organization has spent more t
the moment in president obama's state of the union message when he said, "citizens united is going to invite contributions from foreign companies." >>> last week the supreme court reversed a century of law that i believe will open the flood gates for special interests including foreign corporations. >>> and justice alito out there, "no, it's not true." is it true? >> the reason there was a bone of contention there is that in citizens united itself, stevens, justice stevens and his dissent had said, "this is going to allow foreign money in." the majority in their opinion responded to stevens and said, "there's nothing in this case that has anything to do with foreign money. we're talking about corporate money only. there's a whole separate ban on foreign money in u.s. elections, and that is not being challenged today. so that law remains in place." the issue behind it all is how do we know? if you have all these anonymous sources of spending, we have no way of knowing where the money is coming from. >> take aramco, for example. we talked about the american petroleum institute earlier. one of
of the united states has officially declared himself an enemy of traditional marriage between one man and one woman. >> you are witness to a modern tale of resurrection. a second-coming. the bible speaks of lazarus, raised by jesus from the grave to walk again among the living. ralph reed, too, has been returned to life, political life. but he goes lazarus one further. lazarus was a poor man. reed is rich, and he just keeps getting richer from mixing religion and politics. and that's a story you don't want to miss. at age 33, ralph reed was the christian right's wonder boy. anointed in a 1995 "time" magazine cover story as the "right hand of god" for spinning the trust of conservative christians into political gold. it was reed who built the christian coalition of televangelist pat robertson into a powerful arm of the republican party. >> as religious conservatives we have finally gained what we have always sought. a place at the table, a sense of legitimacy and a voice in the conversation that we call democracy. >> in 2000, reed helped put george w. bush and dick cheney in the white house. >
of things that were not done. simple, humanitarian acts that had not been done by the united states government or the government of the confederacy. so what i find so uplifting about it is watching as drew was saying this response which is profoundly human and speaks to what we all have inside ourselves. the desire to find something larger. not just in a beyond but a larger here and now. some larger sense of identity. some value in the real world that's beyond our own immediate reach. and you see that in a profound way in the civil war, the battlefields. >> rose: we have talked about some other battles. the get sees berg address said what about this? >> well, the get sees berg address read in the context of this understanding of death takes on a particular force in that what lincoln is really trying to do is say what are all these deaths for. and how do they redefine who we are as a people. these people who died that a nation might live so their deaths are the source of a nation's survival. that ties the nation so tightly to the sacrifice. but then he also talks about what the unite
, there is instincts, there's tough calls. >> mr. speaker, the president of the united states. >> woodruff: one of the criticisms of mr. obama's leadership is that he's had so much difficulty winning support from congress. many republicans say that's because he was too beholden to his democratic base. tom davis is a former g.o.p. congressman from virginia. >> when he got elected i think he had every intention of trying to bring everybody together behind him, let's work together, but he had a democratic congress. the minute you go over and sit down with the republicans you'll have pelosi and the democrats fighting saying "we won the election." so the pressure is for him to produce a work product and the republicans weren't going to follow over and say "oh, yeah, let's work together." it's tough situation. when your party controls both houses, those interest groups control the agenda. they don't want to give it away to the other side. >> reporter: but the number two democrat, dick durbin, said the president often took on leaders of his own party. he recounted a late night white house meeting on h
with the european debt crisis, and even within the united states, with it being an election year. >> reporter: but burberry says it has ber luxury goods makers, so it knows it's not alone in seeing the slowdown. as a result, luxury good stocks like lvmh, tiffany, and coach also fell today, although they didn't get hit nearly as hard as burberry. it's not just luxury firms getting hurt by the global slowdown. many other bellwether firms have said revenues are suffering due to weaker sales in china, europe and elsewhere. in the s&p 500, there have been 88 negative pre-announcements for the third quarter so far, and only 20 positive ones. >> the number of negative pre- announcements we've received is the worst in over a decade. we've already seen analysts become very bearish on these companies. >> reporter: last week, chipmaker intel drastically reduced its sales forecast, warning consumers and businesses are buying fewer personal computers. the company also withdrew its full-year guidance, which isid seen as a sign of extreme uncertainty. and fedex recently cut its earnings forecast due to slow
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